Resources

Useful websites

A recent Ithaka report, Sustainability and Revenue Models for Online Academic Resources (2008) has a useful section on content licensing as a tool for enabling online academic content to become more self-sustaining. It compares exclusive and non-exclusive licensing and distribution, as well as syndication and exchange of resources. Since the report was published, a number of interesting case studies of business models have been produced by Ithaka.

The Copyright Clearance Center (www.copyright.com) provides managed services to publishers and to businesses in the US.

Current Cites (http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/) – a freely available digest of abstracts of articles relevant to digital information professionals.

Publaw (http://www.publaw.com/erights2.html) is an introductory guide for electronic clauses in contracts.

Keeping within the Law (www.KWtL.co.uk) – website from Facet Publishing, the publisher of the Chartered Institute of Librarians (CILIP), which contains a collection of material about information law.

Keep your copyrights (http://keepyourcopyrights.org) is a useful site created by legal academics at Columbia University Law School. It is designed for content owners to make most effective use of their content when licensing it. It includes a range of contract clauses, with comments as “creator-friendly”, or “creator-unfriendly”, or even “incredibly overreaching”.

Licensing Models (www.licensingmodels.com) is a free website that provides some standard journal licence agreements that can be freely used or adapted.

PaidContent.org (www.contentnext.com) – an online publication sustained by advertising that provides information and updates on the commercial content licensing scene.

The Fairuse site at Stanford University Libraries (http://fairuse.stanford.edu/) has excellent links and discussion of US copyright law, including relevant case law.

Yale University Library, Licensing Digital Information: a resource for librarians (http://www.library.yale.edu/~llicense/index.shtml) – a valuable site, with lots of relevant and up-to-date information. Mainly useful for libraries.

The SPARC Open Access Newsletter (http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/) is a guide to what is happening in the world of open access scholarship.

The Open Access Directory (http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/ ) is a collectively produced wiki that provides information about open access.

The Canadian Virtual Museum has a useful Canadian Museum’s Guide to Developing a Licensing Strategy at http://www.chin.gc.ca/English/Intellectual_Property/Guide_Developing/ind..., most of which is valid for collections of intellectual property anywhere.

A good way to keep up to date with digital rights management is to read the DRM Watch newsletter at www.drmwatch.com.

For museums and institutions, there is a comprehensive guide to creating and managing a digital content collection at the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) http://www.chin.gc.ca/English/Digital_Content/, including an impressive section devoted to gathering and interpreting usage statistics.